Grand Lecturer’s Blog

GLC Columbia – Greene Ulster – Dutchess 2017

 

Grand Lecturer Convention

Columbia – Greene Ulster – Dutchess

April 18, 2017

This year Columbia, Greene Ulster, and Dutchess Districts hosted a combined Grand Lecturer Convention (GLC).   The GLC was hosted by Monumental Lodge 374 in Tivoli which is in the Columbia District.  It was fortuitous that the district leaders choose a location that could accommodate the convention because of the sheer number in attendance.  The hall was plenty big to accommodate the more than 75 diners.  When we moved upstairs for the convention it when we maxed out the lodge room.  The number of those in attendance enthusiastically increased by more than 50.  There was little room for the floor work.  But everyone was in a good mood and we made it work.

RW Cornelius Hageman, DDGM of the Columbia District opened the convention and he promptly acknowledged all from the three districts, especially all who were responsible for bringing this event together.  The number of Brethren and the enthusiasm they brought to the convention exceeded everyone’s wildest dream.   This is extremely good news as the districts are trying to come to a consensus as the try to consolidate into one Masonic District.

The degree work of the evening was portrayed in a professional manner with feeling and dignity.  The discussions that ensued were though provoking and awakened many of the Brethren to the depth and breadth of the deep meanings that reside in the Middle Chamber Lecture.  I as Grand Lecturer was in heaven.  Masonry does not get much better than this.

Congratulations to Adonai Lodge 718 for qualifying for both the Meacham and Potts Awards.  That brought more members that exceed some GLC totals.  It appears that are a very dedicated group of Masons.  In addition for qualifying for the Potts Award.   It was also a source of pride for the district to have representation from every lodge in the district.  The sidelines were full and the energy was outstanding.  In addition Unity 9 and Wappingers 718 qualified for the Potts Award.  It was great to see the enthusiasm on my good friend RW Uhle ( Worshipful Master of Wappingers) jump up and flash a great big smile when his lodge qualified for Potts Award.

Ain closing I want to thank all those in the three districts that made this and outstanding event.  My hope is that this a a lightning rod for future talks.

West Point Military Academy

The United States Military Academy
The United States Military Academy (USMA), also known as West Point, Army, The Academy, or simply The Point, is a four-year coeducational federal service academy located in West Point, New York in Orange County. It sits on scenic high ground overlooking the Hudson River, 50 miles north of New York City. It is one of the four U.S. military service academies, and one of the five U.S. service academies.
The Academy traces its roots to 1801, when President Thomas Jefferson directed, shortly after his inauguration, that plans be set in motion to establish the United States Military Academy at West Point. The entire central campus is a national landmark and home to scores of historic sites, buildings, and monuments. The majority of the campus’s Norman-style buildings are constructed from gray and black granite. The campus is a popular tourist destination complete with a large visitor center and the oldest museum in the United States Army.
Candidates for admission must both apply directly to the academy and receive a nomination, usually from a member of Congress or Delegate/Resident Commissioner in the case of Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Virgin Islands. Other nomination sources include the President and Vice President of the United States. Students are officers-in-training and are referred to as “cadets” or collectively as the “United States Corps of Cadets” (USCC). Tuition for cadets is fully funded by the Army in exchange for an active duty service obligation upon graduation. Approximately 1,300 cadets enter the Academy each July, with about 1,000 cadets graduating.
The academic program grants a Bachelor of Science degree with a curriculum that grades cadets’ performance upon a broad academic program, military leadership performance, and mandatory participation in competitive athletics. Cadets are required to adhere to the Cadet Honor Code, which states that “a cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.” The academy bases a cadet’s leadership experience as a development of all three pillars of performance: academics, physical, and military.
Most gThe United States Military Academy
The United States Military Academy (USMA), also known as West Point, Army, The Academy, or simply The Point, is a four-year coeducational federal service academy located in West Point, New York in Orange County. It sits on scenic high ground overlooking the Hudson River, 50 miles north of New York City. It is one of the four U.S. military service academies, and one of the five U.S. service academies.
The Academy traces its roots to 1801, when President Thomas Jefferson directed, shortly after his inauguration, that plans be set in motion to establish the United States Military Academy at West Point. The entire central campus is a national landmark and home to scores of historic sites, buildings, and monuments. The majority of the campus’s Norman-style buildings are constructed from gray and black granite. The campus is a popular tourist destination complete with a large visitor center and the oldest museum in the United States Army.
Candidates for admission must both apply directly to the academy and receive a nomination, usually from a member of Congress or Delegate/Resident Commissioner in the case of Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Virgin Islands. Other nomination sources include the President and Vice President of the United States. Students are officers-in-training and are referred to as “cadets” or collectively as the “United States Corps of Cadets” (USCC). Tuition for cadets is fully funded by the Army in exchange for an active duty service obligation upon graduation. Approximately 1,300 cadets enter the Academy each July, with about 1,000 cadets graduating.
The academic program grants a Bachelor of Science degree with a curriculum that grades cadets’ performance upon a broad academic program, military leadership performance, and mandatory participation in competitive athletics. Cadets are required to adhere to the Cadet Honor Code, which states that “a cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.” The academy bases a cadet’s leadership experience as a development of all three pillars of performance: academics, physical, and military.
Most graduates are commissioned as second lieutenants in the Army. Foreign cadets are commissioned into the armies of their home countries. Since 1959, cadets have also been eligible to “cross-commission”, or request a commission in one of the other armed services, provided that they meet that service’s eligibility standards. Every year, a very small number of cadets do this, usually in a one-for-one “trade” with a similarly inclined cadet or midshipman at one of the other service academies.
The academy’s traditions have influenced other institutions because of its age and unique mission. It was the first American college to have an accredited civil-engineering program and the first to have class rings, and its technical curriculum was a model for later engineering schools. West Point’s student body has a unique rank structure and lexicon. All cadets reside on campus and dine together en masse on weekdays for breakfast and lunch. The academy fields fifteen men’s and nine women’s National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports teams. Cadets compete in one sport every fall, winter, and spring season at the intramural, club, or intercollegiate level. Its football team was a national power in the early and mid-20th century, winning three national championships. Its alumni and students are collectively referred to as “The Long Gray Line”, and its ranks include two Presidents of the United States (as well as the President of the Confederate States of America), presidents of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and the Philippines, numerous famous generals, and seventy-six Medal of Honor recipients.
raduates are commissioned as second lieutenants in the Army. Foreign cadets are commissioned into the armies of their home countries. Since 1959, cadets have also been eligible to “cross-commission”, or request a commission in one of the other armed services, provided that they meet that service’s eligibility standards. Every year, a very small number of cadets do this, usually in a one-for-one “trade” with a similarly inclined cadet or midshipman at one of the other service academies.
The academy’s traditions have influenced other institutions because of its age and unique mission. It was the first American college to have an accredited civil-engineering program and the first to have class rings, and its technical curriculum was a model for later engineering schools. West Point’s student body has a unique rank structure and lexicon. All cadets reside on campus and dine together en masse on weekdays for breakfast and lunch. The academy fields fifteen men’s and nine women’s National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports teams. Cadets compete in one sport every fall, winter, and spring season at the intramural, club, or intercollegiate level. Its football team was a national power in the early and mid-20th century, winning three national championships. Its alumni and students are collectively referred to as “The Long Gray Line”, and its ranks include two Presidents of the United States (as well as the President of the Confederate States of America), presidents of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and the Philippines, numerous famous generals, and seventy-six Medal of Honor recipients.

Rhinebeck

Rhinebeck
Rhinebeck is a village in the town of Rhinebeck in Dutchess County. It is part of the Poughkeepsie–Newburgh–Middletown. European settlement in the Rhinebeck area dates to 1686, when a group of Dutch crossed the river from Kingston and bought 2,200 acres of land from the local Iroquois nation. Later, Henry Beekman obtained a patent for the land and saw a need for development to begin. He brought into the area Casper Landsman, a miller, and William Traphagen, a builder. In 1703, the New York colonial assembly approved money for the construction of the King’s Highway, later known as the Albany Post Road and today most of Route 9. Three years later Traphagen bought a tract of land in Beekman’s patent where the King’s Highway intersected the Sepasco Indian Trail, the route today followed by Market Street. He built a house and tavern on the trail a short distance west of the King’s Highway. This was the beginning of Rhinebeck.
A decade later, in 1715, Beekman’s son brought in 35 German Palatines who had fled religious persecution at home and had just concluded an attempt to produce naval stores for the British government on the lands of Robert Livingston to the north in what is now Columbia County. The village grew with the new arrivals. New trades established themselves, and in 1733 the Reformed Dutch Church was built. Its first building was on the site of its current one at Mill and South streets. In 1766 the beginnings of the current Beekman Inn were erected. It has remained in operation as a hotel ever since.
In the mid-1770s, a former soldier named Richard Montgomery moved from Knight’s Bridge (now the Bronx) into the Rhinebeck village with his new wife, a member of the Livingston family. He had just begun to settle into life as a farmer when the American Revolution began. After being elected to the New York Provincial Congress, he was commissioned a general in the Continental Army, and died at the end of 1775 in thRhinebeck
Rhinebeck is a village in the town of Rhinebeck in Dutchess County. It is part of the Poughkeepsie–Newburgh–Middletown. European settlement in the Rhinebeck area dates to 1686, when a group of Dutch crossed the river from Kingston and bought 2,200 acres of land from the local Iroquois nation. Later, Henry Beekman obtained a patent for the land and saw a need for development to begin. He brought into the area Casper Landsman, a miller, and William Traphagen, a builder. In 1703, the New York colonial assembly approved money for the construction of the King’s Highway, later known as the Albany Post Road and today most of Route 9. Three years later Traphagen bought a tract of land in Beekman’s patent where the King’s Highway intersected the Sepasco Indian Trail, the route today followed by Market Street. He built a house and tavern on the trail a short distance west of the King’s Highway. This was the beginning of Rhinebeck.
A decade later, in 1715, Beekman’s son brought in 35 German Palatines who had fled religious persecution at home and had just concluded an attempt to produce naval stores for the British government on the lands of Robert Livingston to the north in what is now Columbia County. The village grew with the new arrivals. New trades established themselves, and in 1733 the Reformed Dutch Church was built. Its first building was on the site of its current one at Mill and South streets. In 1766 the beginnings of the current Beekman Inn were erected. It has remained in operation as a hotel ever since.
In the mid-1770s, a former soldier named Richard Montgomery moved from Knight’s Bridge (now the Bronx) into the Rhinebeck village with his new wife, a member of the Livingston family. He had just begun to settle into life as a farmer when the American Revolution began. After being elected to the New York Provincial Congress, he was commissioned a general in the Continental Army, and died at the end of 1775 in the Battle of Quebec. Montgomery’s cottage still stands, although it was moved to 77 Livingston Street, where it houses the local Daughters of the American Revolution chapter; the street it was on was later named in his honor.
After independence, the village continued to grow. The town of Rhinebeck, which contains the village, was organized in 1788. The current Dutch Reformed Church was built in 1802, making it the oldest church in the village. The current route of East Market Street was laid out the same year during construction of the Ulster-Saulsbury Turnpike, later to become Route 308. Rhinebeck continued to attract politicians. George Washington visited in 1796, dining at Bogardus’s, the second Traphagen Tavern, when he stayed at a nearby friend’s house. During the 1804 gubernatorial election, both Aaron Burr and Morgan Lewis used taverns in Rhinebeck as campaign headquarters.
The village was incorporated in 1834. Ten years later, Alexander Jackson built the Henry Delamater House at 44 Montgomery Street. It still stands today, one of the best examples of the early use of the Gothic Revival style in American residential architecture.
By the 1850s, Rhinebeck had grown even further and acquired a reputation as a woodworking center. The town’s name on milled products was a symbol of quality, and its furniture was shipped as far away as South Carolina. It was said to have no better in making carriages, coaches and sleighs. Some makers of clothing also achieved national prestige. The area was also acquiring a cachet as a location for the country estates of the Gilded Age wealthy, and those people could frequently be seen in town during the summer and on weekends.
e Battle of Quebec. Montgomery’s cottage still stands, although it was moved to 77 Livingston Street, where it houses the local Daughters of the American Revolution chapter; the street it was on was later named in his honor.
After independence, the village continued to grow. The town of Rhinebeck, which contains the village, was organized in 1788. The current Dutch Reformed Church was built in 1802, making it the oldest church in the village. The current route of East Market Street was laid out the same year during construction of the Ulster-Saulsbury Turnpike, later to become Route 308. Rhinebeck continued to attract politicians. George Washington visited in 1796, dining at Bogardus’s, the second Traphagen Tavern, when he stayed at a nearby friend’s house. During the 1804 gubernatorial election, both Aaron Burr and Morgan Lewis used taverns in Rhinebeck as campaign headquarters.
The village was incorporated in 1834. Ten years later, Alexander Jackson built the Henry Delamater House at 44 Montgomery Street. It still stands today, one of the best examples of the early use of the Gothic Revival style in American residential architecture.
By the 1850s, Rhinebeck had grown even further and acquired a reputation as a woodworking center. The town’s name on milled products was a symbol of quality, and its furniture was shipped as far away as South Carolina. It was said to have no better in making carriages, coaches and sleighs. Some makers of clothing also achieved national prestige. The area was also acquiring a cachet as a location for the country estates of the Gilded Age wealthy, and those people could frequently be seen in town during the summer and on weekends.

St. Johnsville

St. Johnsville

St. Johnsville is a town in Montgomery County, New York. Accounts vary as to the naming of St. Johnsville, but most accounts state that the town and its village are named after an early surveyor and commissioner, Alexander St. John.  Still others credit the naming of St. Johnsville to a former name for the area, St. John’s Church.  The Town of St. Johnsville is in the northwest part of the county. The town contains a village, also called St. Johnsville. Both town and village are about halfway between Utica and Amsterdam.

The Erie Canal, as part of the Mohawk River, is at the town’s south border.  The town was first settled around 1725. The territory was part of the Palatine District.  In 1769, Sir William Johnson built a church in the town for the benefit of his Indian allies.  A brief skirmish was fought in the town in 1780 near Fort Klock, a fortified house.  The Town of St. Johnsville was formed in 1838 from the Town of Oppenheim which then became part of the newly created Fulton County.

In 1857, the community of St. Johnsville set itself off from the town by incorporating as a village.  According to the Enterprise and News, Nov. 17, 1937, by 1934, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Reaney had given 120 acres of land to the Village of Saint Johnsville. This land was named Klock Park after Dr. Charles M. Klock, a highly regarded local physician. Today the H.C Smith Benefit Club utilizes the building to host many community events.

GLC Fulton Montgomery 2017

 

Grand Lecturer Convention

Fulton Montgomery District

April 17, 2017

The Grand Lecturer Convention (GLC) experience began with my lodging at the Inn by the Mill Bed and Breakfast facility owned by the Treasurer of St. Johnsville Lodge.  The setting was warm, secluded and extremely relaxing.  A definite getaway from the hustle of the buzz of the city.  St. Johnsville 611 hosted the convention in the lodge building which has undergone many improvements throughout the past number of years.  There was a social hour followed by a home cooked dinner that preceded the GLC.  The atmosphere was laid back, but many of the district’s concerns were discussed.

I can’t’ say enough about the hospitality afforded me by all the district.  Once the convention began.  After some necessary remarks, the GLC began.  The Middle Chamber Lecture (MCL) was covered by two ritualist with pride and confidence.  Many of the profound message of the MCL was discussed; some in great depth.   As the district only has two MCL ritualist, they understood the need to start preparing for the future and not wait for an emergency to force their hands.  It was a terrific night for Masonry in the Fulton Montgomery District.  I look forward to my next visit.

Congratulations to Kennyetto Lodge 599 for qualifying for the Potts Award.   It was also a source of pride for the district to have representation from every lodge in the district.  The sidelines were full and the energy was outstanding.

Chrysler Building

Chrysler Building
The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco style skyscraper located on the East Side of Midtown Manhattan in New York City, at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue in the Turtle Bay neighborhood. At 1,046 feet, the structure was the world’s tallest building for 11 months before it was surpassed by the Empire State Building in 1931.
It is the tallest brick building in the world, with a steel structure. After the destruction of the World Trade Center, it was again the second-tallest building in New York City until December 2007, when the spire was raised onto the 1,200-foot Bank of America Tower, making the Chrysler building the third tallest building in New York. In addition, The New York Times Building, which opened in 2007, is exactly level with the Chrysler Building in height. Both buildings were then demoted to fourth tallest building in the city, when the under-construction One World Trade Center surpassed their height, and then to fifth position by 432 Park Avenue, which was completed in 2015.
The Chrysler Building is a classic example of Art Deco architecture and considered by many contemporary architects to be one of the finest buildings in New York City. In 2007, it was ranked ninth on the List of America’s Favorite Architecture by the American Institute of Architects. It was the headquarters of the Chrysler Corporation from 1930 until the mid-1950s. Although the building was built and designed specifically for the car manufacturer, the corporation did not pay for the construction of it and never owned it, as Walter P. Chrysler decided to pay for it himself, so that his children could inherit it
The Chrysler Building was designed by architect William Can Alen. When the ground breaking occurred on September 19, 1928, there was an intense competition in New York City to build the world’s tallest skyscraper. Despite a frantic pace (the building was built at an average rate of four floors per week), no workers died during the construction of this skyscraper.
Van Alen’s original design for the skyscraper called for a decorative jewel-like glass crown. It also featured a base in which the showroom windows were tripled in height and topped by 12 stories with glass-wrapped corners, creating an impression that the tower was floating in mid-air. The height of the skyscraper was also originally designed to be 807 feet. However, the design proved to be too advanced and costly for building contractor William H. Reynolds, who disapproved of Van Alen’s original plan. The design and lease were then sold to Walter P. Chrysler, who worked with Van Alen and redesigned the skyscraper for additional stories; it was eventually revised to be 925 feet tall. As Walter Chrysler was the chairman of the Chrysler Corporation and intended to make the building into Chrysler’s headquarters, various architectural details and especially the building’s gargoyles were modeled after Chrysler automobile products like the hood ornaments of the Plymouth; they exemplify the machine age in the 1920s.
Construction commenced on September 19, 1928. In total, 391,881 rivets were used and approximately 3,826,000 bricks were manually laid, to create the non-loadbearing walls of the skyscraper. Contractors, builders and engineers were joined by other building-services experts to coordinate construction.
Prior to its completion, the building stood about even with a rival project at 40 Wall Street, designed by H. Craig Severance. Severance increased the height of his project and then publicly claimed the title of the world’s tallest building. (This distinction excluded structures that were not fully habitable, such as the Eiffel Tower. In response, Van Alen obtained permission for a 125 foot long spire and had it secretly constructed inside the frame of the building. The spire was delivered to the site in four different sections. On October 23, 1929, the bottom section of the spire was hoisted to the top of the building’s dome and lowered into the 66th floor of the building. The other remaining sections of the spire were hoisted and riveted to the first one in sequential order in just 90 minutes.

Central Park Zoo

Central Park Zoo

The Central Park Zoo is a small 6.5-acre zoo located in Central Park in New York City. It is part of an integrated system of four zoos and the New York Aquarium managed by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA).

The zoo began in the 1860s as a menagerie, making it the first official zoo to open in New York. The zoo was modified in 1934, with the addition of many new buildings ranged in a quadrangle around the sea lion pool. (The zoo from this era has been commonly known as the “1934 Zoo” or “Robert Moses Zoo”.) Finally, the zoo was renovated in the mid-1980s and reopened in 1988, replacing the old-fashioned cages with naturalistic environments.

Trellised, vine-clad, glass-roofed pergolas link the three major exhibit areas—tropic, temperate and polar— housed in discreet new buildings of brick trimmed with granite, masked by vines. The zoo is home to an indoor rain forest, a chilled penguin house and a previously unoccupied polar bear pool now occupied by a pair a grizzly bear siblings. It also coordinates breeding programs for some endangered species: tamarin monkeys, Wyoming toads, thick-billed parrots and red pandas. There are also fruit bats in the rainforest and a large free-flight area for birds. In June 2009, snow leopard exhibit was opened.  

The zoo was not part of the original “Greensward” design for Central Park created by Olmsted and Vaux, but a Central Park menagerie near New York’s Arsenal, on the edge of Central Park located at Fifth Avenue facing East 64th Street, spontaneously evolved in 1859 from gifts of exotic pets and other animals informally given to the Park; the original animals on display included a bear and some swans. In 1864, a formal zoo received charter confirmation from New York’s assembly, making it the United States’ second publicly owned zoo, after the Philadelphia Zoo, which was founded in 1859. The new zoo was given permanent quarters behind the Arsenal building in 1875.

In 1934, to properly house the zoo, neo-Georgian brick and limestone zoo buildings ranged in a quadrangle round the sea lion pool were designed by Aymar Embury II, architect for the Tri-borough Bridge and the Henry Hudson Bridge. The famous sea lion pool itself was originally designed by Charles Schmieder. For its day the sea lion pool was considered advanced because the architect actually studied the habits of sea lions and incorporated this knowledge into the design.

The zoo’s original Children’s Zoo opened in 1961, funded largely in part by Senator Herbert Lehman and his wife Edith. The children’s zoo featured attractions like a petting area with ducks, rabbits, and chickens; a large fiberglass whale statue dubbed “Whaley” (which acted as the entrance to the small zoo); a Noah’s Ark feature; and a medieval castle feature.

By 1980, the zoo, like Central Park itself, was dilapidated; in that year, responsibility for its management was assumed by the New York Zoological Society (renamed the Wildlife Conservation Society in 1993). The zoo was closed in the winter of 1983, and demolition began. The redesign of 1983–88 was executed by the architectural firm of Kevin Roche Dinkeloo. The facility’s old-fashioned menagerie cages were replaced with more naturalistic exhibits. The zoo reopened to the public on August 8, 1988.  The newly renovated zoo had originally been planned to reopen in 1985 at a cost of $14 million; however, the project saw troubled times that delayed the opening for three years. Some of the original buildings, with their low-relief limestone panels of animals, were reused in the redesigning, though the cramped outdoor cages were demolished. Most of the large animals were rehoused in larger, more natural spaces at the Bronx Zoo. The central feature of the original zoo, ranged round the sea lion pool, was retained and the pool redesigned. Since its modernization, the Central Park Zoo, originally available to park goers free of charge, charges admission to its enclosed precincts. The Dancing Crane Cafe, however, is still accessible from Central Park itself.

A famous hoax at the zoo is also known as The Central Park Zoo Escape and the Central Park Menagerie Scare of 1874. It was a hoax perpetrated by James Gordon Bennet in his newspaper, the New York Herald. The Herald’s cover story claimed that there had been a mass escape of animals from the Central Park Zoo and several people had been killed by the now free-roaming beasts. A rhinoceros was said to be the first escapee, goring his keeper to death and setting into motion the escape of his neighbors. Other animals the Herald reported free and included “a polar bear, a panther, a Numidian lion, several hyenas, and a Bengal tiger.”  At the end of the lengthy article, which was divided across several pages of the newspaper, the following notice was the only indication that the story horrifying readers across the city was a hoax: “Of course, the entire story given above is a pure fabrication. Not one word of it is true.” That was not enough to assuage critics, however, who accused Bennett of inciting panic when the extent of the hoax became widely known.   The authors later claimed their intent was merely to draw attention to inadequate safety precautions at the zoo, and claimed to be surprised at the extent of the reaction to their story.

LeFrak City

LeFrak City

LeFrak City (originally spelled Lefrak is a very large apartment development in the southernmost region of Corona and the easternmost part of Elmhurst, a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens It is located between Junction Boulevard, 57th Avenue, 99th Street and the Long Island Expressway. The complex of twenty 16-story apartment towers (with the topmost floor signed as 18, the lobbies are the 2nd floors and there are no 13th floors) covers 40 acres and currently houses over 14,000 people. The development is part of Queens Community Board 4.

Named for its developer, the LeFrak Organization (founded by Samuel J. LeFrak), LeFrak City was built in 1960–1969 primarily for working- and middle-class families who were interested in modern facilities but could not afford or did not desire to live in Manhattan. The fortunes of the buildings have been closely tied to housing and social trends in New York in general, and today the complex is home to a very diverse population. The development remains popular (i.e. has low vacancy) due to its reasonable rents, and large apartments.

The site includes sitting and play areas, sports courts, a swimming pool, a branch of the Queens Borough Public Library, a post office, two large office buildings, shops, and over 3,500 parking spaces. Recent retail developments such as Queens Center Mall and Rego Center are a short walk away.

GLC Noble 9th 2017

 

Grand Lecturer Convention

9th Manhattan

March 30, 2017

The Noble Ninth Grand Lecturer Convention (GLC) began once again at the Villagio Restaurant which is known for their great Italian dishes and warm décor.  The evening began with a social hour and meeting with the Wardens’ Association and many of the district’s leadership.  After the Italian feast, we traveled to the Whitestone Masonic Center for the convention.

GLC is hosted and Funded by the 2016-2017 Wardens Association. This is the only Wardens Association that sponsors a convention in the state.  The structure of their association enables for s strong district and provides association members many opportunities to develop many of the skill sets to thrive as Masonic leaders.

The Middle Chamber Lecture (MCL) was covered with an array of ritualist with pride and confidence.  Many of the profound message of the MCL was discussed; some in great depth.  Outstanding work by the Noble Ninth.  The GLC also ends with some German food and libations for anyone that still has any room.  A thoroughly great time was had by all.

Congratulations to Lessing Lodge 608 and Uhland Lodge 735 for qualifying for the Potts Award.  In addition, the Meacham Award was presented to King Solomon Lodge 232 for receiving the coveted Meacham Award.

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller, 10 November 1759 – 9 May 1805) was a German poet, philosopher, physician, historian, and playwright. During the last seventeen years of his life (1788–1805), Schiller struck up a productive, if complicated, friendship with the already famous and influential Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. They frequently discussed issues concerning aesthetics, and Schiller encouraged Goethe to finish works he left as sketches. This relationship and these discussions led to a period now referred to as Weimar Classicism. They also worked together on Xenien, a collection of short satirical poems in which both Schiller and Goethe challenge opponents to their philosophical vision.
Friedrich Schiller grew up in a very religious family and spent much of his youth studying the Bible, which would later influence his writing for the theatre. His father was away in the Seven Years War when Friedrich was born. He was named after King Frederick the Great, but he was called Fritz by nearly everyone. Kaspar Schiller was rarely home during the war, but he did manage to visit the family once in a while. His wife and children also visited him occasionally wherever he happened to be stationed. When the war ended in 1763, Schiller’s father became a recruiting officer and was stationed in Schwäbisch Gmünd. The family moved with him. Due to the high cost of living—especially the rent—the family moved to nearby Lorch.
Although the family was happy in Lorch, Schiller’s father found his work unsatisfying. He sometimes took his son with him. In Lorch, Schiller received his primary education. The quality of the lessons was fairly bad, and Friedrich regularly cut class with his older sister. Because his parents wanted Schiller to become a pastor, they had the pastor of the village instruct the boy in Latin and Greek. Pastor Moser was a good teacher, and later Schiller named the cleric in his first play Die Räuber (The Robbers) after him. As a boy, Schiller was excited by the idea of becoming a cleric and often put on black robes and pretended to preach.
In 1766, the family left Lorch for the Duke of Württemberg’s principal residence, Ludwigsburg. Schiller’s father had not been paid for three years, and the family had been living on their savings but could no longer afford to do so. So Kaspar Schiller took an assignment to the garrison in Ludwigsburg. There the Schiller boy came to the attention of Karl Eugen, Duke of Wurttemberg. He entered the Karlsschule Stuttgart (an elite military academy founded by the Duke), in 1773, where he eventually studied medicine. During most of his short life, he suffered from illnesses that he tried to cure himself.
While at the Karlsschule, Schiller read Rousseau and Goethe and discussed Classical ideals with his classmates. At school, he wrote his first play, The Robbers, which dramatizes the conflict between two aristocratic brothers: the elder, Karl Moor, leads a group of rebellious students into the Bohemian Forest where they become Robin Hood-like bandits, while Franz Moor, the younger brother, schemes to inherit his father’s considerable estate. The play’s critique of social corruption and its affirmation of proto-revolutionary republican ideals astounded its original audience. Schiller became an overnight sensation. Later, Schiller would be made an honorary member of the French Republic because of this play.
In 1780, he obtained a post as regimental doctor in Stuttgart, a job he disliked. In order to attend the first performance of The Robbers in Mannheim, Schiller left his regiment without permission. As a result, he was arrested, sentenced to 14 days of imprisonment, and forbidden by Karl Eugen from publishing any further works.
He fled Stuttgart in 1782, going via Frankfurt, Mannheim, Leipzig, and Dresden to Weimar. Along this journey he had an affair with an army officer’s wife Charlotte von Kalb. She was at the center of an intellectual circle, and she was known for her cleverness and instability. Schiller needed help to extricate himself from his family and friends. Schiller settled in Weimar in 1787. In 1789, he was appointed professor of History and Philosophy in Jena, where he wrote only historical works.

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